Read Mark Zuckerberg’s full commencement address at Harvard

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg gave an impassioned — and at times emotional — 30-minute commencement address Thursday at Harvard College, the school where he created Facebook before dropping out over 10 years ago.

Zuckerberg’s speech was themed around the idea of finding purpose, both in your own life and in the lives of other people. He also touched on a number of important political themes, including the rising cost of education and the dangers of climate change.

You can read the full speech, courtesy of Facebook, below.

Harvard Commencement 2017

President Faust, Board of Overseers, faculty, alumni, friends, proud parents, members of the ad board, and graduates of the greatest university in the world,

I’m honored to be with you today because, let’s face it, you accomplished something I never could. If I get through this speech, it’ll be the first time I actually finish something at Harvard. Class of 2017, congratulations!

I’m an unlikely speaker, not just because I dropped out, but because we’re technically in the same generation. We walked this yard less than a decade apart, studied the same ideas and slept through the same Ec10 lectures. We may have taken different paths to get here, especially if you came all the way from the Quad, but today I want to share what I’ve learned about our generation and the world we’re building together.

But first, the last couple of days have brought back a lot of good memories.

How many of you remember exactly what you were doing when you got that email telling you that you got into Harvard? I was playing Civilization and I ran downstairs, got my dad, and for some reason, his reaction was to video me opening the email. That could have been a really sad video. I swear getting into Harvard is still the thing my parents are most proud of me for.

What about your first lecture at Harvard? Mine was Computer Science 121 with the incredible Harry Lewis. I was late so I threw on a t-shirt and didn’t realize until afterwards it was inside out and backwards with my tag sticking out the front. I couldn’t figure out why no one would talk to me — except one guy, KX Jin, he just went with it. We ended up doing our problem sets together, and now he runs a big part of Facebook. And that, Class of 2017, is why you should be nice to people.

But my best memory from Harvard was meeting Priscilla. I had just launched this prank website Facemash, and the ad board wanted to “see me”. Everyone thought I was going to get kicked out. My parents came to help me pack. My friends threw me a going away party. As luck would have it, Priscilla was at that party with her friend. We met in line for the bathroom in the Pfoho Belltower, and in what must be one of the all time romantic lines, I said: “I’m going to get kicked out in three days, so we need to go on a date quickly.”

Actually, any of you graduating can use that line.

I didn’t end up getting kicked out — I did that to myself. Priscilla and I started dating. And, you know, that movie made it seem like Facemash was so important to creating Facebook. It wasn’t. But without Facemash I wouldn’t have met Priscilla, and she’s the most important person in my life, so you could say it was the most important thing I built in my time here.

We’ve all started lifelong friendships here, and some of us even families. That’s why I’m so grateful to this place. Thanks, Harvard.

Today I want to talk about purpose. But I’m not here to give you the standard commencement about finding your purpose. We’re millennials. We’ll try to do that instinctively. Instead, I’m here to tell you finding your purpose isn’t enough. The challenge for our generation is creating a world where everyone has a sense of purpose.

One of my favorite stories is when John F Kennedy visited the NASA space center, he saw a janitor carrying a broom and he walked over and asked what he was doing. The janitor responded: “Mr. President, I’m helping put a man on the moon”.

Purpose is that sense that we are part of something bigger than ourselves, that we are needed, that we have something better ahead to work for. Purpose is what creates true happiness.

You’re graduating at a time when this is especially important. When our parents graduated, purpose reliably came from your job, your church, your community. But today, technology and automation are eliminating many jobs. Membership in communities is declining. Many people feel disconnected and depressed, and are trying to fill a void.

As I’ve traveled around, I’ve sat with children in juvenile detention and opioid addicts, who told me their lives could have turned out differently if they just had something to do, an after school program or somewhere to go. I’ve met factory workers who know their old jobs aren’t coming back and are trying to find their place.

To keep our society moving forward, we have a generational challenge — to not only create new jobs, but create a renewed sense of purpose.

I remember the night I launched Facebook from my little dorm in Kirkland House. I went to Noch’s with my friend KX. I remember telling him I was excited to connect the Harvard community, but one day someone would connect the whole world.

The thing is, it never even occurred to me that someone might be us. We were just college kids. We didn’t know anything about that. There were all these big technology companies with resources. I just assumed one of them would do it. But this idea was so clear to us — that all people want to connect. So we just kept moving forward, day by day.

I know a lot of you will have your own stories just like this. A change in the world that seems so clear you’re sure someone else will do it. But they won’t. You will.

But it’s not enough to have purpose yourself. You have to create a sense of purpose for others.

I found that out the hard way. You see, my hope was never to build a company, but to make an impact. And as all these people started joining us, I just assumed that’s what they cared about too, so I never explained what I hoped we’d build.

A couple years in, some big companies wanted to buy us. I didn’t want to sell. I wanted to see if we could connect more people. We were building the first News Feed, and I thought if we could just launch this, it could change how we learn about the world.

Nearly everyone else wanted to sell. Without a sense of higher purpose, this was the startup dream come true. It tore our company apart. After one tense argument, an advisor told me if I didn’t agree to sell, I would regret the decision for the rest of my life. Relationships were so frayed that within a year or so every single person on the management team was gone.

That was my hardest time leading Facebook. I believed in what we were doing, but I felt alone. And worse, it was my fault. I wondered if I was just wrong, an imposter, a 22 year-old kid who had no idea how the world worked.

Now, years later, I understand that *is* how things work with no sense of higher purpose. It’s up to us to create it so we can all keep moving forward together.

Today I want to talk about three ways to create a world where everyone has a sense of purpose: by taking on big meaningful projects together, by redefining equality so everyone has the freedom to pursue purpose, and by building community across the world.

First, let’s take on big meaningful projects.

Our generation will have to deal with tens of millions of jobs replaced by automation like self-driving cars and trucks. But we have the potential to do so much more together.

Every generation has its defining works. More than 300,000 people worked to put a man on the moon – including that janitor. Millions of volunteers immunized children around the world against polio. Millions of more people built the Hoover dam and other great projects.

These projects didn’t just provide purpose for the people doing those jobs, they gave our whole country a sense of pride that we could do great things.

Now it’s our turn to do great things. I know, you’re probably thinking: I don’t know how to build a dam, or get a million people involved in anything.

But let me tell you a secret: no one does when they begin. Ideas don’t come out fully formed. They only become clear as you work on them. You just have to get started.

If I had to understand everything about connecting people before I began, I never would have started Facebook.

Movies and pop culture get this all wrong. The idea of a single eureka moment is a dangerous lie. It makes us feel inadequate since we haven’t had ours. It prevents people with seeds of good ideas from getting started. Oh, you know what else movies get wrong about innovation? No one writes math formulas on glass. That’s not a thing.

It’s good to be idealistic. But be prepared to be misunderstood. Anyone working on a big vision will get called crazy, even if you end up right. Anyone working on a complex problem will get blamed for not fully understanding the challenge, even though it’s impossible to know everything upfront. Anyone taking initiative will get criticized for moving too fast, because there’s always someone who wants to slow you down.

In our society, we often don’t do big things because we’re so afraid of making mistakes that we ignore all the things wrong today if we do nothing. The reality is, anything we do will have issues in the future. But that can’t keep us from starting.

So what are we waiting for? It’s time for our generation-defining public works. How about stopping climate change before we destroy the planet and getting millions of people involved manufacturing and installing solar panels? How about curing all diseases and asking volunteers to track their health data and share their genomes? Today we spend 50x more treating people who are sick than we spend finding cures so people don’t get sick in the first place. That makes no sense. We can fix this. How about modernizing democracy so everyone can vote online, and personalizing education so everyone can learn?

These achievements are within our reach. Let’s do them all in a way that gives everyone in our society a role. Let’s do big things, not only to create progress, but to create purpose.

So taking on big meaningful projects is the first thing we can do to create a world where everyone has a sense of purpose.

The second is redefining equality to give everyone the freedom they need to pursue purpose.

Many of our parents had stable jobs throughout their careers. Now we’re all entrepreneurial, whether we’re starting projects or finding or role. And that’s great. Our culture of entrepreneurship is how we create so much progress.

Now, an entrepreneurial culture thrives when it’s easy to try lots of new ideas. Facebook wasn’t the first thing I built. I also built games, chat systems, study tools and music players. I’m not alone. JK Rowling got rejected 12 times before publishing Harry Potter. Even Beyonce had to make hundreds of songs to get Halo. The greatest successes come from having the freedom to fail.

But today, we have a level of wealth inequality that hurts everyone. When you don’t have the freedom to take your idea and turn it into a historic enterprise, we all lose. Right now our society is way over-indexed on rewarding success and we don’t do nearly enough to make it easy for everyone to take lots of shots.

Let’s face it. There is something wrong with our system when I can leave here and make billions of dollars in 10 years while millions of students can’t afford to pay off their loans, let alone start a business.

Look, I know a lot of entrepreneurs, and I don’t know a single person who gave up on starting a business because they might not make enough money. But I know lots of people who haven’t pursued dreams because they didn’t have a cushion to fall back on if they failed.

We all know we don’t succeed just by having a good idea or working hard. We succeed by being lucky too. If I had to support my family growing up instead of having time to code, if I didn’t know I’d be fine if Facebook didn’t work out, I wouldn’t be standing here today. If we’re honest, we all know how much luck we’ve had.

Every generation expands its definition of equality. Previous generations fought for the vote and civil rights. They had the New Deal and Great Society. Now it’s our time to define a new social contract for our generation.

We should have a society that measures progress not just by economic metrics like GDP, but by how many of us have a role we find meaningful. We should explore ideas like universal basic income to give everyone a cushion to try new things. We’re going to change jobs many times, so we need affordable childcare to get to work and healthcare that aren’t tied to one company. We’re all going to make mistakes, so we need a society that focuses less on locking us up or stigmatizing us. And as technology keeps changing, we need to focus more on continuous education throughout our lives.

And yes, giving everyone the freedom to pursue purpose isn’t free. People like me should pay for it. Many of you will do well and you should too.

That’s why Priscilla and I started the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and committed our wealth to promoting equal opportunity. These are the values of our generation. It was never a question of if we were going to do this. The only question was when.

Millennials are already one of the most charitable generations in history. In one year, three of four US millennials made a donation and seven out of ten raised money for charity.

But it’s not just about money. You can also give time. I promise you, if you take an hour or two a week — that’s all it takes to give someone a hand, to help them reach their potential.

Maybe you think that’s too much time. I used to. When Priscilla graduated from Harvard she became a teacher, and before she’d do education work with me, she told me I needed to teach a class. I complained: “Well, I’m kind of busy. I’m running this company.” But she insisted, so I taught a middle school program on entrepreneurship at the local Boys and Girls Club.

I taught them lessons on product development and marketing, and they taught me what it’s like feeling targeted for your race and having a family member in prison. I shared stories from my time in school, and they shared their hope of one day going to college too. For five years now, I’ve been having dinner with those kids every month. One of them threw me and Priscilla our first baby shower. And next year they’re going to college. Every one of them. First in their families.

We can all make time to give someone a hand. Let’s give everyone the freedom to pursue their purpose — not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because when more people can turn their dreams into something great, we’re all better for it.

Purpose doesn’t only come from work. The third way we can create a sense of purpose for everyone is by building community. And when our generation says “everyone”, we mean everyone in the world.

Quick show of hands: how many of you are from another country? Now, how many of you are friends with one of these folks? Now we’re talking. We have grown up connected.

In a survey asking millennials around the world what defines our identity, the most popular answer wasn’t nationality, religion or ethnicity, it was “citizen of the world”. That’s a big deal.

Every generation expands the circle of people we consider “one of us”. For us, it now encompasses the entire world.

We understand the great arc of human history bends towards people coming together in ever greater numbers — from tribes to cities to nations — to achieve things we couldn’t on our own.

We get that our greatest opportunities are now global — we can be the generation that ends poverty, that ends disease. We get that our greatest challenges need global responses too — no country can fight climate change alone or prevent pandemics. Progress now requires coming together not just as cities or nations, but also as a global community.

But we live in an unstable time. There are people left behind by globalization across the world. It’s hard to care about people in other places if we don’t feel good about our lives here at home. There’s pressure to turn inwards.

This is the struggle of our time. The forces of freedom, openness and global community against the forces of authoritarianism, isolationism and nationalism. Forces for the flow of knowledge, trade and immigration against those who would slow them down. This is not a battle of nations, it’s a battle of ideas. There are people in every country for global connection and good people against it.

This isn’t going to be decided at the UN either. It’s going to happen at the local level, when enough of us feel a sense of purpose and stability in our own lives that we can open up and start caring about everyone. The best way to do that is to start building local communities right now.

We all get meaning from our communities. Whether our communities are houses or sports teams, churches or music groups, they give us that sense we are part of something bigger, that we are not alone; they give us the strength to expand our horizons.

That’s why it’s so striking that for decades, membership in all kinds of groups has declined as much as one-quarter. That’s a lot of people who now need to find purpose somewhere else.

But I know we can rebuild our communities and start new ones because many of you already are.

I met Agnes Igoye, who’s graduating today. Where are you, Agnes? She spent her childhood navigating conflict zones in Uganda, and now she trains thousands of law enforcement officers to keep communities safe.

I met Kayla Oakley and Niha Jain, graduating today, too. Stand up. Kayla and Niha started a non-profit that connects people suffering from illnesses with people in their communities willing to help.

I met David Razu Aznar, graduating from the Kennedy School today. David, stand up. He’s a former city councilor who successfully led the battle to make Mexico City the first Latin American city to pass marriage equality — even before San Francisco.

This is my story too. A student in a dorm room, connecting one community at a time, and keeping at it until one day we connect the whole world.

Change starts local. Even global changes start small — with people like us. In our generation, the struggle of whether we connect more, whether we achieve our biggest opportunities, comes down to this — your ability to build communities and create a world where every single person has a sense of purpose.

Class of 2017, you are graduating into a world that needs purpose. It’s up to you to create it.

Now, you may be thinking: can I really do this?

Remember when I told you about that class I taught at the Boys and Girls Club? One day after class I was talking to them about college, and one of my top students raised his hand and said he wasn’t sure he could go because he’s undocumented. He didn’t know if they’d let him in.

Last year I took him out to breakfast for his birthday. I wanted to get him a present, so I asked him and he started talking about students he saw struggling and said “You know, I’d really just like a book on social justice.”

I was blown away. Here’s a young guy who has every reason to be cynical. He didn’t know if the country he calls home — the only one he’s known — would deny him his dream of going to college. But he wasn’t feeling sorry for himself. He wasn’t even thinking of himself. He has a greater sense of purpose, and he’s going to bring people along with him.

It says something about our current situation that I can’t even say his name because I don’t want to put him at risk. But if a high school senior who doesn’t know what the future holds can do his part to move the world forward, then we owe it to the world to do our part too.

Before you walk out those gates one last time, as we sit in front of Memorial Church, I am reminded of a prayer, Mi Shebeirach, that I say whenever I face a challenge, that I sing to my daughter thinking about her future when I tuck her into bed. It goes:

“May the source of strength, who blessed the ones before us, help us *find the courage* to make our lives a blessing.”

I hope you find the courage to make your life a blessing.

Congratulations, Class of ’17! Good luck out there.



Pippa Middleton wedding: Royals and celebrities at ceremony

Guests including the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have attended the wedding of Pippa Middleton and James Matthews.

Miss Middleton, 33, who is the younger sister of the duchess, married 41-year-old Mr Matthews at St Mark’s Church in Englefield, Berkshire.

The bride was accompanied by her father, Michael, as they arrived shortly after 11:15 BST for the 45-minute ceremony.

The church is a few miles from the Middleton family home in Bucklebury.

There was strict security in place on the estate, with villagers being asked to carry ID on the day, and asked not to speak to the press.

But the bride received a rousing cheer from around 100 royal fans and residents as she arrived.

Prince Harry, Princess Eugenie, and Roger Federer and his wife Mirka were among the guests at the church.

the guests at the church.

James Matthews and Pippa Middleton
Duchess of Cambridge stands with her daughter, Princess Charlotte, and the other bridesmaids and page boysThe Duchess of Cambridge stood with her daughter, Princess Charlotte, and the other bridesmaids and page boys as she waited for her sister to arrive
Pippa Middleton in her wedding carThe bride arrived with her father in a 1951 Jaguar Mk V car

The heavy downpour that started minutes after the beginning of the service ended a few moments before the church doors opened.

Wedding bells rang out just before 12.30 BST as the new husband and wife walked hand in hand along the church path.

Guests filed out and walked to nearby Englefield House, where it is believed a champagne reception is being held.

Pippa Middleton in her wedding veil
The Duchess of Cambridge adjusting Pippa Middleton's dressThe Duchess of Cambridge wore a blush pink dress by Alexander McQueen – the designer she chose for her own wedding gown

Miss Middleton wore a bespoke Giles Deacon dress, said to be crafted to create the impression of being seamless.

The dress was teamed with a Stephen Jones veil, a Maidenhair Fern tiara, and Manolo Blahnik ivory satin shoes.

David Emanuel, who designed Princess Diana’s wedding dress and hosts Say Yes to the Dress UK, called the gown “simple and pretty”.

“I predicted it would be soft and pretty and very English, which it is,” he said.

The bride’s nephew and niece, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, were page boy and flower girl.

Actress Meghan Markle, Prince Harry’s girlfriend, is also reportedly in the UK but was not seen among the guests at the church.

Prince George, a page boy and princess Charlotte, a bridesmaid.Prince George was a page boy and his sister, Princess Charlotte, was a bridesmaid
The Duchess of Cambridge with her daughter, Princess Charlotte
Prince George and Princess Charlotte with other page boys and a flower girl

The BBC’s Adele Tobe in Englefield

Pippa Middleton was driven to St Mark’s Church alongside her father in a vintage 1951 Jaguar car. They shared a few words and then walked up to the church door to be greeted by the very excited bridesmaids and pageboys which included Princess Charlotte and Prince George.

A group of local well-wishers were allowed to come close to the church and were able to see all the guests arrive – including tennis star, Roger Federer.

Less than an hour later, the pair left the church as husband and wife.

They posed for photographs before leading their guests – by foot – through the park back to Englefield House for a reception, before carrying on to their party at Pippa’s parents’ house in Bucklebury.

The best man was reality TV star Spencer Matthews, the groom’s 28-year-old younger brother.

Miss Middleton’s diamond engagement ring is reported to have cost £250,000 – nearly 10 times the budget for the average wedding day.

But details of the couple’s wedding bands have not been revealed.

Princess EugeniePrincess Eugenie attended the ceremony with her partner Jack Brooksbank
Spencer Matthews, brother of the groom, greets Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Britain's Prince HarryReality TV star Spencer Matthews is brother of the groom and best man
James Middleton, brother of the bride, walks with his mother Carole Middleton as they attend the wedding of Pippa Middleton and James MatthewsJames Middleton, brother of the bride, accompanied his mother Carole Middleton as they arrived at church

Englefield resident Elizabeth Mary Reeves sported a silver wristband with the wedding date 20.05.17 printed on, given exclusively to locals who were let into the private church grounds to get a better look.

She said of the bride: “She stood and waved and looked just lovely. As all brides do, they glow, no matter how expensive their dress is.

“She looked absolutely beautiful.”

The 68-year-old, whose daughter and son married at the same church, said the bride and groom looked “very happy” as they waved to the small crowd gathered on the church green.

“(Prince) George was waving, (Princess) Charlotte was waving and Kate stooped next to them.

“I just love it. I think it’s so good for the village, so good for the country, and it just gives it a happy mood and we need a happy mood.”

Roger Federer and his wife MirkaRoger Federer and his wife Mirka were among the guests
Wedding guestsThe guests were dressed in a colourful array of outfits

After the ceremony, guests will celebrate the marriage in a large glass marquee, erected on the Middleton family’s property.

Among the members of the public who gathered in the village was Meryl Elizabeth Evans, from south Wales.

“It’s a nice atmosphere, everybody’s friendly, it’s just a nice country feel to it,” she said.

“We’ve met people from around the world, and the camera crews are from everywhere. It is the wedding of the year, isn’t it?”

St Mark's ChurchSt Mark’s Church is situated on private land

Release my sex tape if you have it; Bisa Kdei dares

Award winning highlife artiste, Bisa Kdei has denied allegations he slept with another musician’s wife in Belgium.

He has gone a step further to dare his accuser to release the sex tape she claims to have if she truly has it.

A video went viral on social media by a Facebook user who accused Bisa Kdei of sleeping with the wife of a fellow artiste. She requested for a Range Rover Evoque to stay mute.

However, in an interview on Hitz High Table with Dr Pounds on Hitz FM, Bisa Kdei stated the move by the lady was dumb attempt to blackmail him and said she should release his sex tape if she has it.

“I don’t know whether she has a personal beef with me or a friend but what she did excuse me to say is so dumb,” he said.

He added that, “since she is saying she has my sex tape, she should release it for all my fans to watch my sex tape. My fans want to watch my sex tape otherwise I am giving her the chance to apologise to Ghanaians.”

Bisa Kdei admitted knowing the lady he is alleged to have slept with but does not know the lady who did the viral video.

“The girl is one of my fans I took a snap with in Belgium.  She looks like she is either seventeen or nineteen years,” the musician explained.

Bisa Kdei recently returned to Ghana after a hugely successful tour of the United States.

Meanwhile, the lady who threatened to release the video, has rendered an apology to the musician for falsely accusing him.

–Hitz Fm

Oscars 2017: Moonlight wins best picture after announcement mix-up

Moonlight has won best picture at the Oscars – but only after an error saw La La Land initially declared the winner.

The La La Land producers were in the middle of their acceptance speeches when the mistake was discovered.

Price Waterhouse Cooper, the accountancy firm responsible for counting the ballots, apologised for the mix-up.

La La Land still ended up the biggest winner of the night, taking home six Oscars including a best actress award for Emma Stone.

Moonlight’s surprise best picture win took its haul to three, the low-budget film having earlier won the adapted screenplay award and a best supporting actor prize for Mahershala Ali.

Casey Affleck was named best actor for Manchester by the Sea, while Viola Davis was named best supporting actress for Fences.

Damien Chazelle, La La Land’s 32-year-old director, became the youngest film-maker to win the best director Oscar.

Acting winners

  • Casey Affleck – best actor, Manchester by the Sea
  • Emma Stone – best actress, La La Land
  • Mahershala Ali – best supporting actor, Moonlight
  • Viola Davis – best supporting actress, Fences

Yet this year’s ceremony will be remembered for its closing moments, when Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway arrived on stage to announce the best picture winner.

Beatty had been mistakenly handed the previous winner’s envelope, containing a card that said Emma Stone had won best actress for La La Land.


If you wish me dead, I wish you dead also – Sonnie Badu

UK-based Ghanaian gospel musician Sonnie Badu, clearly unhappy with false reports that he has passed, has wished death upon his detractors.

Hurt by the reportage, the musician, who is currently in Australia, pointed out that, those who wished him dead should suffer same fate within three weeks.

On Sunday, February 26, news went viral that the musician had passed at a hospital in Australia.

A statement by management of the artiste explained that “After about two hours, his fans were updated that he was well and has been discharged from the hospital.”

But in a post on Instagram on Monday, February 27, Sonnie Badu threatened to take legal action against those who published the false story.

“All bloggers with false information claiming they spoke to someone from our camp and stupidly put confirmed!! have 30mins to take it off their site…..failure to do so will result in a lawsuit from which all proceeds will be given to orphans,” he threatened.

The gospel musician and minister further noted that, “….. and if that is your wish, within 3 weeks may you experience what you typed.”

Grammys get political as Adele struggles with performance, wins big

It wouldn’t be an awards show in 2017 without at least a little bit of politics taking center stage and a whole lot of drama.

James Corden, Katy Perry, Jennifer Lopez, Busta Rhymes and more all touched on the political climate at the 59th annual Grammy Awards, and Adele literally stopped the show to restart her tribute to George Michael before she took home album and record of the year — beating Beyonce.

Adele would finish the big winner of the night – winning for Album of the Year for “25” and Record of the Year for “Hello” – but the show didn’t start out with some shakiness.

The singer first opened the show with a straight-forward performance of her hit “Hello” before James Corden took the stage and things took a turn for the political

“The Late Late Show” host rapped the stars in the audience, and at the end of his rap Corden commented on politics, sharing a message of unity and quipping about President Donald Trump.

“…With President Trump we don’t know what comes next,” he said mid-rap. “We can survive by sticking together.”

After Corden finished his introduction, Jennifer Lopez presented the first award of the evening and also talked politics.

“At this particular point in history, our voices are needed more than ever,” she said hinting at the Trump presidency.

JLo presented the award for best new artist to Chance The Rapper.

Katy Perry went farther, taking the stage to perform “Chained to the Rhythm” with “We the people” written behind her and an armband that read “persist.” And later on, Tribe Called Quest chanted “resist” in a politically-charged performance. Busta Rhymes repeatedly called President Donald Trump “President Agent Orange” as the group sharply criticized Trump’s recent executive order attempting to freeze immigration from several Muslim majority countries and called it a “Muslim ban.”

Earlier, Adele, who had trouble with her live performance at last year’s Grammys, restarted her tribute to George Michael.

The famous singer cursed and then said with teary-eyes, “I can’t mess this up for him… Can we please start again?” She apologized for swearing when she won song of the year for “Hello.”

It wasn’t the only hiccup of the night. Lady Gaga’s mashup with Metallica got off to a slow start with James Hetfield’s microphone not working at all.

Throughout the night, a slew of other A-list stars performed such as Keith Urban and Carrie Underwood, Ed Sheeran and Beyonce.

Introduced by her mother, Beyonce took the stage in a glittered gown and headdress for a performance that began with a long, spoken video-enhanced presentation about mothers and children. The highly-anticipated performance by the pregnant pop star got a standing ovation from the crowd.

Corden had his own attention-grabbing moment when he showed up in the star-studded audience with a mobile Carpool Karaoke cutout car and prompted stars like Lopez, John Legend, Urban and Faith Hill to team up with him and Neil Diamond to sing “Sweet Caroline.”

Twenty One Pilots were early winners during the night. They accepted the trophy for best pop duo for “Stressed out” in their underwear, a move Corden mimicked when the show returned from a commercial break.

Beyonce took home the award for best urban contemporary album for “Lemonade,” and David Bowie won a posthumous Grammy for best rock song during the telecast for “Blackstar.” Meanwhile, Maren Morris won the award for best country solo performance for “My Church.”


Pregnant Beyonce keeps all eyes on her despite shock Grammy loss

A surprise loss didn’t stop Beyonce from being center of attention Sunday’s Grammy awards, as the pregnant singer delivered the night’s most anticipated performance and was praised on stage by the artist who triumphed over her.

Beyonce, 35, went into music’s biggest night with a leading nine nominations including the top awards of the night – album, record and song of the year – but lost all three to Britain’s Adele.

“The ‘Lemonade’ album is so monumental and so well thought out and so beautiful and soul-baring, and we got to see another side to you that you don’t always let us see and we appreciate that,” Adele said, addressing Beyonce, as she accepted the album of the year award for “25.”

Beyonce, dressed in a red sequined gown, mouthed ‘thank you,’ as she looked on.

The R&B singer did win two Grammy awards, including best urban contemporary album for “Lemonade.”

“My intention was to create a body of work that would give voice to our pain, our struggles, our darkness and our history,” Beyonce said as she accepted her Grammy trophy.

While Beyonce is usually known to deliver energetic dance-filled performances, the singer opted to slow things down now she is expecting twins and instead centered her set on the theme of motherhood.

For her performance of “Love Drought” and “Sandcastles,” a video projection of Beyonce dressed in a gold chain bikini and gold halo crown appeared on stage, as she caressed her pregnant belly and posed with her mother Tina Lawson and 5-year-old daughter Blue Ivy.

Beyonce then appeared for real on stage, dressed in a nude sequined dress and crown, strutting along the top of a long table strewn with flowers while her dancers, dressed in flowing dresses, surrounded her. At one point, she sat on a chair on top of the table, which tipped back as she sang.

The performance ended with the singer standing in the spotlight as her dancers raised their intertwined arms behind her, looking upwards as Beyonce’s voice recites, “If we’re going to heal, let it be glorious.”

A proud Jay Z wiped tears from his eyes as he cuddled Blue Ivy, who was dressed in a pink tuxedo in homage to Prince.

Beyonce’s mother introduced her performance, praising the singer for her “devotion and love” and her “powerful words and music.”